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The climate crisis doesn’t exist. Even if temperatures rise up to 4 degrees, life on this planet will still flourish. Though with less humans flourishing. The climate crisis is a human crisis. It’s a result of what has changed the planet in ways nothing ever has before: the human mind.

In contrast to my dog’s mind, the human mind lets us understand that our life is finite. It also lets us understand that life in itself doesn’t have meaning, despite the meaning we give it. Smart as we are, we therefore invented stories. Like religion and myth. They relieve us of this double-whopper pain that finiteness and meaninglessness bring along. The stories tell us that our true self is immortal. They tell us that we are part of a greater whole that endures our small (in)significant life. Often, these stories are contradictory. And often, they are based on mere beliefs which makes our need to defend them strong. …


Five Inconvenient Human Tendencies that Wire You for Unsustainability

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Photo by Bret Kavanaugh on Unsplash

Bertrand Russell said, “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are so certain of themselves and wiser people so full of doubts”.

Imagine for a second that I am Betrand Russel. To give you a visual support, this is what I look like:


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Photo by Lidya Nada on Unsplash

Maybe you are one of those people who say all they want in life is to be happy. To wake up every day in a world that is just like you have always wanted it to be, with a house on the beach, surrounded by nature, yet having all amenities of urbanity right at your doorstep; being super successful, while working 2 hours a day; having the perfect relationship and tons of lovers and admirers; being so trim that even Gwen Stefanie gets jealous, while eating everything you want. Or something like that.

Well, actually it’s more mundane and takes much less effort. …


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Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

Frida* was four years old when her parents took her to soccer practice. Ever since her older brother played soccer she wanted to play the same game. After a warm up, the rules were explained and the game started. Frida was all excited. She jumped up and down and shouted at everyone to pass her the ball. Finally, she got it. She knew what to do: score a goal. And she did. Not one, but many. When she got the ball, she ran to the nearest goal. The problem was, it was her own team’s goal. She didn’t care. It was closer and her mum was the goal keeper. She shot one own goal after the other. And she would have lived happily ever after, if it wasn’t for her team mate who called her out and ridiculing her. …


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When talking about sustainable lifestyles, the first thoughts that comes to mind are things like sorting your trash, buying less, wasting less, going vegan. Sustainable Lifestyles are a lot more than that though. Lifestyles touch all spheres of existence. Your existence is not only what you do at home. Your existence touches your personal, your professional and your political life.

You might say that this is all of life then, why not call it “sustainable life”. The reason is — as I will explain in more detail below — that styles encompass the design question. And that’s what it’s about. …


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Photo by Charles on Unsplash

Religion is like bad sex: Everyone says they don’t have it, but in reality everyone does.

Which of the following do you consider true?

  • Climate Change is real.
  • People should stop at a red traffic light.
  • You have a good life.
  • Your dog is loyal to you.

The fact is, that your experiences is always embedded in a larger whole. That larger whole is made up of your culture, your history, your expectations, your thought-patterns. It’s like glasses through which you see the world, glued to your nose. Your glasses are your personal narrative that you came up with throughout your life. Unique. …


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by Mark Basarab unsplash

It’s 2020. How has your last year been? Have you hit the ceiling because of climate change? Because you were stung by a bee? Because protests popped up all around the planet? Because climate negotiators suck? Because your toenail grew in? If you didn’t hit a ceiling about anything, then… well, then let me tell you, why you should. Because to most of us the world seems pretty fucked. And most of us have no idea what to do about it (except for the toenail thing).

Most scientific papers I read start with “We live in unprecedented times…”.

Well, it’s actually not so unprecedented, as you will see shortly.
But to get there, let’s fist look at the ways the world seems fucked. …


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“There is no worse deprivation, no worse privation, perhaps, than that of the losers in the symbolic struggle for recognition, for access to a socially recognized social being, in a word, to humanity”. Pierre Bourdieu

We don’t promote what we consume, but we came to promote ourselves. We are the goods. No matter, if you sell your book, tupperware, science or lifestyle. As participants of the market, we market ourselves. Other people become our customers. Instead of seeing them as another subject, we see them as an object with a function: to buy our product, to buy us.


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Photo by Noah Buscher on Unsplash

You are the Hero

There is Thomas Carlyle’s “Great Man” theory focusing on the individual as the hero. Our current culture and literature is dominated by putting the individual in the centre. It’s an attitude of ‘you want to change, change yourself’. Bookstores (where they still exist) are full of self-help literature. It’s one of the most growing online-markets.

By thinking this way it appears that it doesn’t matter what your circumstances are, you are responsible and able to change your life however you like to. If you fail, it’s your fault.

You are Your Environment

And there is the “Zeitgeist” theory, identified with Leo Tolstoy, where social circumstances are key and the individual simply a product of circumstances. The German philosopher Martin Heidegger argued that who you are is determined by the culture you live in; it comes from Being-in-the-world. Each person becomes whomever they are by learning from and existing within a culture. Recent psycho-social research, especially on depression, shows, that outside circumstances determine depression. …


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Photo by Mitch Lensink on Unsplash

I consider myself a minimalist. For me, a minimalist is someone who has as little stuff as necessary. And that means, that a lot of technical and digital stuff is too much. There is no essential need for a smart watch or an Alexa in my living room. There is no need for a tablet or for a google home.

All these technical devices are not essential for human beings. What they cause is environmental destruction due to the exploitation of resources and human exploitation due to cheap work forces, especially in south-east Asia. …

About

Jessica Böhme

author & researcher for eco-lifestyles. Inspired by philosophy, science, arts and self-experiments // www.jessicaboehme.com // new book: https://amzn.to/3h8Z1uA

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